FROM THE ROAD.

City safari: the surrounded animals take refuge with us

Smooth-mantled otters are commonly seen in reservoirs and some parks and number about 50 in Singapore.

One of the otter families was chosen by newspaper readers as a national icon. Until a few years ago it was very rare to see them in this place, but with the rehabilitation of the canals they have reappeared.

A 2022 video shows police blocking traffic in front of the presidential palace to allow a group of otters to cross the street.

But there are many other examples of wild animals that approach the cities.

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Otters in Singapore
Smooth-mantled otters are commonly seen in reservoirs and some parks and number about 50 in Singapore. One of the otter families was chosen by newspaper readers as a national icon. Until a few years ago it was very rare to see them in this place, but with the rehabilitation of the canals they have reappeared. A 2022 video shows police blocking traffic in front of the presidential palace to allow a group of otters to cross the street. But there are many other examples of wild animals that approach the cities.
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Penguins in Cape Town
A mischievous penguin wriggles as bathers enjoy the mild summer weather on Cape Town's Boulders Beach. A city may not seem like the most obvious place to come across an endangered colony of African penguins, however these white-bellied birds have been a common sight on the beaches of Boulders and Foxy since the 80s, And they still show no sign of wanting to change. Local conservation efforts have increased bird numbers to thousands.
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Flying fox - Sydney
In Australia it is difficult to stay away from wildlife, even in cities. This is particularly true in Sydney, where a few years ago a wallaby jumped across theHarbour Bridge. The situation becomes particularly lively at dusk, when large bats, known as flying foxes, come out of their tree shelters and, in western Sydney, tiny sugar glider begin to hover in the dark.
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Goshawk in Sydney
Berlin is home to many types of animals, from raccoons, which are still descended from a fur farm of the 40s, to wild boars, but also the largest population in the world of urban goshawk. These mighty birds of prey, slate-gray in color with striped underparts, seem to thrive in the city's many parks, cemeteries, and suburban forests. Thanks to their strength and speed, they can tear smaller birds out of the air while in flight.
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Seals in Vancouver
Walking through the middle of the Stanley Park Seawall, there is a good chance of seeing a pair of brown eyes and a funny face emerge from the water, often even at close range. Port seals frequent the area and this has also led to the sighting of killer whales. Killer whales have also been spotted at the pier in downtown Coal Harbour, probably looking for a seal meal.
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Giraffes in Nairobi
Giraffes obviously do not walk the streets of Kenya's capital, but they are absolutely close. More than 100 species of wild mammals graze and still roam in the 12,000-hectare grasslands of Nairobi National Park, where the business district's corporate towers pile up in the background. Zebras, black rhinos and even lions are among the creatures that still surround the city. Of course they are: they were there first.
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20/02/2024
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